PT Overview2016-11-28T23:16:33+00:00

General Information

My approach to hip repair and preservation recognizes that physical therapy is critical to recovery and positive outcomes.  I know PT is hard work and I commend you for your efforts.  We have prepared a video to orient you to my approach to physical therapy.  If you did not have surgery or are seeking hip-safe exercises, please refer to my Non-Op Protocol.

Patients

Most of Dr. Wolff’s patients are prescribed physical therapy protocols.  Many of these protocols are intended to be followed in conjunction with care by a physical therapist.  Please review your prescribed protocol in advance and contact us if you have any questions.  It would be best to print your protocol and bring it with you to your first physical therapy session.

If you have trouble following your protocol or are unable to follow it for any reason, please contact your physical therapist, if you are still under the care of one, or Dr. Wolff’s office.

Protocols

Non-Op Protocol
Protocol A
Protocol D
Protocol G
Return to Running Program 
Aqua Therapy Program

Therapists

I rely heavily on good relationships with therapists in treating our mutual patients. I firmly believe that open communication between the therapist and doctor is vital to the success of any patient’s recovery, so please never hesitate to reach out to me through my assistant, Catherine, who will help to get us in touch.  Patients’ progression will vary widely. It is rare to have a patient progress through this rehab protocol without setbacks. Keeping this in mind, here is some insight into my post-op PT philosophy:

  • Good recovery depends on the therapist and patient monitoring the effects of each particular exercise. If it hurts, the patient doesn’t need to do it! – regardless of the time from surgery.
  • Utilize the exercise descriptions as a guide. They are not intended to serve as a substitute for clinical decision-making; adjust within given guidelines and precautions as needed.
  • Manual therapy (including modalities, dry needling, ART, etc.) is an important part of recovery. However, the initial weeks of therapy following surgery should focus on manual treatment and gait/crutch training.
  • Do not feel obligated to do every exercise in the protocol.